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Bauer, L., & Bauer, W. (2000). Nova Zelandia est Omnis Divisa in Partes Tres. New Zealand English Journal, 14, 7-17.

Bauer, W. (2006). Maori. In K. Brown (Ed.), Encyclopedia of Language and linguistics (2nd Edition). Amsterdam, Netherlands: Elsevier Ltd.

Bell, A. (2000). Maori and Pakeha English: A Case Study. In A. Bell & K. Kuiper (Eds.), New Zealand English. Amsterdam, Netherlands: John Benjamins Publishing Company.

Benton, R. A. (1991). The Maori Language: Dying or Reviving? Wellington, New Zealand: East West Center.

Calude, A., Miller, S., Harper, S., & Whaanga, H. [2019]. Matariki - a case-study of Māori loanwords in New Zealand English. Asia and Pacific Variation Journal, Vol 5, Issue 2, pp. 109-137.

Calude, A, Stevenson, S., Whaanga, H., & Keegan, TT. [In Press/2019] Loanwords in Digital Discourse: Māori Loanwords in National Science Challenge websites. Journal of the Royal Society of New Zealand.

Calude, A., Pagel, M., & Miller, S. (2018). Modelling borrowing success - a quantitative study of Māori loanwords in New Zealand English. Journal of Corpus Linguistics and Linguistics Theory.

Daly, N. (2007). Kukupa, Koro, and Kai: The use of Maori vocabulary items in New Zealand English Children's Picture Books. New Zealand English Journal, 21, 20-33.

Daly, N. (2008). The Narrative Contract and the use of Māori Loanwords in New Zealand English Picture Books. Journal of Children's Literature Studies, 5(2), 1-17.

Daly, N. (2009). Overhearing Tangi, Tangaroa, and Taniwha: The reported effects of Māori loanwords in children's picture books on language use and cultural knowledge of adult readers. Te Reo, 52, 3-16.

Daly, N. (2010). 'Right here, right now': Embracing New Zealand national identity through the Maori loanwords used in New Zealand English children's picture books. Journal of Children's Literature Studies, 7(2), 22-37.

Daly, N.(2013). 'It's part of me that I want them to know about': Maintaining distant New Zealand national identity in Canada using New Zealand picture books. In B. Carrington & P. Pinsent (eds) The Final Chapters: Concluding Papers of the Journal of Children's Literature Studies. Wizard's Tower Press, p.3-14.

Daly, N. (2017). Pākehā-Māori: European-Native. Ethnic labelling in the Dorothy Neal White Collection. New Review of Children's Literature and Librarianship.

Davies, C., & Maclagan, M. (2006). Maori Words - Read all about it: testing the presence of 13 Maori words in 4 New Zealand newspapers from 1997 to 2004. Te Reo, 49, 73-99.

de Bres, J. (2006). Maori lexical items in the mainstream television news in New Zealand. New Zealand English Journal, 20, 17-34.

Degani, M. (2017). Cultural Conceptualisations in Stories of Māori-English Bilinguals: The Cultural Schema of marae. In Advances in Cultural Linguistics (pp. 661-682). Springer Singapore.

Degani, M. (2010). The Pakeha myth of one New Zealand/Aoteroa: An exploration in the use of Maori loanwords in New Zealand English. In R. Facchinetti, D. Crystal, & B. Seidlhofer (Eds.), From International to Local English - And Back Again. Bern, Switzerland: Peter Lang.

Degani, M., & Onysko, A. (2010). Hybrid compounding in New Zealand English. World Englishes, 29(2), 209-233.

Deverson, T. (1991). New Zealand English Lexis: The Maori dimension. English Today, 7(2), 18-25.

Harper, S. (2017). The Reo of Our Lives - using Māori borrowings in New Zealand newspapers. "Building A Corpus of Maori loanwords" presented at the Summerschool Research Fellowships, University of Waikato, NZ supervised by A. Calude, H. Whaanga and S. Miller.

Kennedy, G. (2001). Lexical Borrowing from Maori in New Zealand English. In B. Moore (Ed.), Who's Centric Now? The Present State of Post-Colonial Englishes. Canberra, Australia: Oxford University Press.

Levendis, K., & Calude, A. (2019). Flagging loanwords and what they can tell us - a case-study from New Zealand English. Ampersand, Vol 6, doi.org/10.1016/j.amper.2019.100056. [PDF]

Macalister, J. (2000). The Changing Use of Maori Words in New Zealand English. New Zealand English Journal, 14, 41-47.

Macalister, J. (2001). Writing Maori English: Voices in Pounamu, Pounamu. Kotare, 4(1), 46-54.

Macalister, J. (2001). Introducing a New Zealand newspaper corpus. New Zealand English Journal, 15, 35-41.

Macalister, J. (2004). Listening to Proper Nouns: Social Change and Maori Proper Noun Use in New Zealand English. New Zealand English Journal, 18, 24-34.

Macalister, J. (2006). The Maori lexical presence in New Zealand English: Constructing a corpus for diachronic change. Corpora, 1(1), 85-98.

Macalister, J. (2006). The Maori Presence in the English Lexicon, 1850-2000. English World-Wide, 27(1), 1-24.

Macalister, J. (2007). Weka or woodhen? Nativization through lexical choice in New Zealand English. World Englishes, 26(4), 492-506.

Macalister, J. (2008). Tracking Changes in Familiarity with Borrowing from Te Reo Maori. Te Reo, 51, 75-97.

Macalister, J. (2009). Investigating the changing use of te reo. NZ Words, 13, 3-4.

MacDonald, D., Daly, N. (2013). Kiwi, kapai, and kuia: Māori loanwords in New Zealand English children's picture books published between 1995 and 2005. In B. Carrington & P. Pinsent (eds) The Final Chapters: Concluding Papers of the Journal of Children's Literature Studies. Wizard's Tower Press. p.44-56.

Onysko, A. (2016). Enhanced creativity in bilinguals? Evidence form meaning interpretations of novel compounds. International Journal of Bilingualism, 20, 315-334. doi:10.1177/1367006914566081

Onysko, A. & Calude, A. (2014). Comparing the usage of Māori loans in spoken and written New Zealand English: A case study of Māori, Pākeha, and Kiwi. In Zenner, Eline and Gitte Kristiansen (eds.). New Perspectives on Lexical Borrowing. pp. 45-72. Berlin, New York: De Gruyter.

Onysko, A., & Degani, M. (2014). Listening to a voice canoe: Differences in meaning association between Māori bilingual and Pākehā monolingual speakers. In A. Onysko, M. Degani, & J. King (Eds.), He Hiringa, He Pūmanawa - Studies on the Māori Language: In Honour of Ray Harlow (pp. 179-210). Wellington, NZ: Huia Publishers.

Onysko, A., & Degani, M. (2014). Finding a wooden jandal in the jandal wood: The role of bilingualism for the interpretation of headedness in novel English compounds. In L. Filipovic & M. Pütz (Eds.), Multilingual Cognition and Language Use: Processing and Typological Perspectives (pp. 309-332). Amsterdam & Philadelphia: John Benjamins.

Quinn, H. (2000). Variation in New Zealand English Syntax and Morphology. In A. Bell & K. Kuiper (Eds.), New Zealand English. Amsterdam, Netherlands: John Benjamins Publishing Company.

Stubbe, M., & Holmes, J. (2000). Talking Maori or Pakeha in English: Signalling Identity in Discourse. In A. Bell & K. Kuiper (Eds.), New Zealand English. Amsterdam, Netherlands: John Benjamins Publishing Company.

Trye, D, Calude, Andreea, Bravo-Marquez, Felipe, & Keegan, Te Taka. [Under review] Hybrid Hashtags - #YouKnowYoureAKiwiWhen your Tweet contains English and Māori. Frontiers Special Issue on Computational Sociolinguistics.

Trye, D, Bravo-Marquez, Felipe, Calude, Andreea, & Keegan, Te Taka. (2019) Māori Loanwords: a Corpus of New Zealand English Tweets. 57th Annual Meeting of the Association for Computational Linguistics (ACL).

Maintained by Andreea S. Calude (University of Waikato, NZ). Last updated June 2017.